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Adventures in Photography: A Century of Images in Archaeology and Anthropology

November 11, 2011 - March 3, 2013

The words adventure and anthropology conjure up imagery of both the fictional Indiana Jones and real explorers, such as Hiram Bingham, credited with finding Peru’s Machu Picchu, and Howard Carter, who discovered the tomb of Tutankhamen. The history of anthropology is packed with tales of exotic destinations and unprecedented discoveries.

With the opening of Adventures in Photography: A Century of Images in Archaeology and Anthropology, SDMoM aims to showcase some of the untold stories of anthropology. Sixty vintage photographs were chosen from the University of Pennsylvania’s extensive collection, spanning over one hundred years and six continents. This exhibition was organized by the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

The journey begins in Nippur (in modern day Iraq), in 1895, when anthropologists uncovered a series of cuneiform tablets that “formed the basis of our understanding of the first literate society in the world, the Sumerians.” Harriet Boyd Hawes, the first woman to excavate on the island of Crete (1901 – 1904), is also featured, shown with her full staff of male workers. Two additional photographs depict excavations of the ancient Maya city of Tikal, in Guatemala, which since has become one of the most important Maya archaeological sites on record.

The faces of people from all over the world peer back from the past, showing both the uniqueness and the commonalities among us all. Come join us for your own Adventure now through January 13, 2013. Check for our listing of public programs at www.museumofman.org/calendar.

TOWER PHOTO CONTEST: Click here to submit a photo

 

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All images are the sole property of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.