San Diego, Calif.–January 25, 2010–Visitors arriving at the San Diego Airport will know they are close to Mexico when they pass by the San Diego Museum of Man’s off-site exhibit in Terminal 2, scheduled to open on Feb. 2, 2010. The exhibit, Hecho en México: Mexican Folk Art will introduce visitors to some of the colorful and powerful pieces of the Museum of Man’s collection of Mexican folk art. 

nov. head 
Folk art is a vibrant industry in Mexico.  With the growth of the travel industry, crafts have become an important source of income for the country, especially as the rural population becomes economically marginalized. The relatively simple technology and low capitalization needed for craft production encourages its development as an alternative source of employment.
 
Folk art is about one-of-a-kind hand-made objects, produced on a relatively small scale. The objects produced are infinitely varied and reflect the creative imagination of the individual maker. While pieces may closely resemble each other, few are ever alike, as artists add their own unique touches to each piece.
 
Mexican art helps us see the diverse country from the inside-in homes, in the market, in customs, traditions, and rituals. Mexico possesses a great wealth of craftsmanship that plays an important role in many communities, for their own use and for sale to tourists and collectors. 
 
The Hecho en México: Mexican Folk Art exhibit will feature pottery (including Talavera jugs and Mata Ortiz pottery), Nahua masks, paper arts and paper maiche, Oaxacan wood carvings, metal (including silver jewelry), textiles, baskets, gourds and blown glass. Although each piece will be different, we can count one thing: together the collection will be colorful!
 
The San Diego Museum of Man is the only anthropology and archaeology museum in San Diego County. It houses outstanding cultural collections and physical anthropology collections and features five permanent exhibitions, including Ancient Egypt; Kumeyaay: Native Californians; Footsteps Through Time: Four Million Years of Human Evolution; Maya: Heart of Sky, Heart of Earth; and Discover Egypt. 
 
¡Vivian los Artesanos!