Tails of Service: From Playful Puppy to Devoted Service Dog

Celebrate service animals with us Saturday, May 18, as we partner with Canine Companions for Independence to bring you Tails of Service: From Playful Puppy to Devoted Service Dog. During this panel discussion, both humans and dogs will explore and demonstrate the journey from puppy to service animal. The discussion panel is presented as a complement to our disability awareness exhibit access/ABILITY, which includes a component about service animals.

 

 

Speakers will include experts who nurture, train, and give a caring nature to these animals.

  • Breeder-caretakers who care for puppies until they are eight weeks old. 
  • Puppy raisers who teach puppies basic commands they need to know before training. 
  • Trainers who teach these talented dogs the skills they need to become valued companions. 
  • Recipients of canine companions will explain the special bond they share with their four-legged friends. 

Panelists will bring service animals at different levels of training to demonstrate the abilities of these amazing animals.

Click on image to enlarge. 

Generously sponsored by the

 

Dr. Ida Rigby & Mr. John Sturla

We Are Not Robots: Richard Louv on Reconnecting with Our Humanity

What does it mean to be human? Are we less human than we were before technology, before connectedness, before we started spending so much time indoors and in front of electronic screens?

Join the San Diego Museum of Man as we partner with Write Out Loud’s "The Big Read" to bring award-winning journalist and author Richard Louv to the museum Saturday, April 20.

Starting with the explosive and controversial themes in Ray Bradbury’s novel Fahrenheit 451, Richard will explain a heartening vision of the future in which our lives are as immersed in nature as they are in technology.

His way to a happy and healthier society is through the natural world around us, a theme he explored in his books The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder and Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder.

Saturday, April 20, 2013
6 p.m. lecture. A book signing will follow.
San Diego Museum of Man
1350 El Prado, San Diego, CA 92101

Purchase tickets here: $10 for members, $15 for non-members.
Be sure to get your tickets in advance! This event is expected to sell out. Tickets must be purchased ahead of time and will not be sold at the door.

Robot photo by Oliver Hodach. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Beyond Taking a Stand: Different Ways to Approach the Issue of Bullying

As part of the San Diego Museum of Man’s new contemporary panel series, Beyond Taking a Stand: Different Ways to Approach the Issue of Bullying will be presented in conjunction with access/ABILITY, an exhibit about disability awareness, and Instruments of Torture, an exhibit that examines torture and how we, as humans, take action against it.

Panelists will present their unique anti-bullying perspectives:

  • Award-winning author and public speaker Devin Hughes will share ideas from his new comic book, Self-Talk, which teaches effective ways to build self-esteem and self-worth to children who are struggling to fit in. 
  • Lonnie Rowell, associate professor in the counseling program at University of San Diego, will discuss his research on bullying and the work he has done in San Diego to reduce violence and bullying in schools. 
  • Roddey Reid, interdisciplinary scholar and professor at UC San Diego, will discuss his research about bullying outside of schools and the lifelong effects of repeated bullying. 
  • Founding and executive members of the high school organization 3V will discuss their inspiration to start an anti-bullying movement in their schools and their ideas to improve social policies about bullying. 

Information about directions and parking.

This event is free with museum admission and, as always, free to members.

Past Meets Present – Lunch Lecture

How much has Balboa Park changed in the last 100 years? Dr. Dave Roberts, history buff and expert photographer, will answer that question as he shares images and stories of the park's transformation in two lectures and an exhibit. In the exhibit, four photographs from our extensive archives will be displayed next to modern photographs taken at the same locations. As we rotate the photographs featured in Past Meets Present, never-before-seen facets of the park will be revealed, illuminating our collective history and inviting reflection. Past Meets Present Lectures Friday, February 15th, noon Saturday, February 16th, 11 a.m.

 

  • Free to museum members or included with the price of non-member museum admission
  • Location: Irving J. Gill Building, just west of the San Diego Museum of Man, 1350 El Prado, San Diego, CA
  • Information about directions and parking

Past Meets Present – Lunch Lecture

How much has Balboa Park changed in the last 100 years? Dr. Dave Roberts, history buff and expert photographer, will answer that question as he shares images and stories of the park's transformation in two lectures and an exhibit. In the exhibit, four photographs from our extensive archives will be displayed next to modern photographs taken at the same locations. As we rotate the photographs featured in Past Meets Present, never-before-seen facets of the park will be revealed, illuminating our collective history and inviting reflection.

Past Meets Present Lectures: Friday, February 15th, noon, and Saturday, February 16th, 11 a.m.

  • Free to museum members or included with the price of non-member museum admission
  • Location: Irving J. Gill Building, just west of the San Diego Museum of Man, 1350 El Prado, San Diego, CA
  • Information about directions and parking

 

Panel Discussion

Join us on Saturday June 16 @ 11 a.m. for an insightful discussion!

What positive impact has skateboarding made in Native American communities? Find out at this fascinating panel presentation with three Native American experts!

  • Kilma Lattin, from the Pala Band of Mission Indians, is a former Tribal Councilmember who oversaw the development of a 22,000 square-foot skateboard park on the Pala Reservation. 
  • Alan Lechusza Aquallo, Ph.D., (Luiseño/Maidu), is a skate enthusiast and a Professor at Palomar College specializing in Native art, music, and culture. 
  • O'Jay Vanegas (Native Mexican/Navajo) is the owner of Con Safos Sk8 Co. and an avid Southern California skater. 

Space is limited, so arrive early! Panel discussion begins at 11 a.m. in the SDMoM Gill Auditorium (located just west of the main museum building).

Free with general Museum admission. Please show your admission receipt at the door.

Visit museumofman.org/rampitup for more details about all of our upcoming public programs, including professional skateboard demonstrations and operating hours for the half-pipe.

Ramp It Up: Skateboard Culture in Native America is organized by the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian and circulated by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service.

Multi-Faith Forum

Presented by: Taha Hassane (Imam, Islamic Center of San Diego), Steven Cooper (Pastor, Harbor Presbyterian Church), and Abe Lin (Secretary General, Buddha's Light International Association San Diego).

Moderated by: Dr. Micah Parzen (CEO, San Diego Museum of Man).

Each speaker will give a 15 minute presentation of their faith and share the reasons why they chose their faith over other available belief systems. A 30-40 minute moderated audience Q/A session will follow the presentations. The venue will remain open for an hour after the Q/A for socializing and continued discussion. Check out this similar event previously conducted at Stanford to get an idea of what to expect: http://multifaithforum.stanford.edu.

Refreshments served! Doors open at 6pm. Contact Ethan for more info: sdmultifaithforum@gmail.com

Click here to view event flyer

The Upright Ape: Bipedalism and Human Origins

A CARTA Public Symposium entitled "The Upright Ape:  Bipedalism and Human Origins"  will be held Friday, December 16, 2011, from 1:00-5:00 p.m. in the Robinson Auditorium, IR/PS Campus of UC San Diego.  Below is the list of speakers and their talk titles.  Please share the information and the attached poster with your students and colleagues.

For more information, or If you wish to register for this free symposium, please visit http://carta.anthropogeny.org/events/bipedalism-and-human-origins.

 

Symposium Chairs:
Steven Churchill, Duke University
Chris Ruff, Johns Hopkins University

Speakers:
Steven Churchill, Duke University, “Pelvic architecture of Australopithecus sediba and genus Homo”
Jeremy DeSilva, Boston University, “Foot and ankle diversity in Australopithecus”
Matt Tocheri, Smithsonian University, “Insights into hominin bipedalism from gorilla anatomy”
Brian Richmond, George Washington University, “Pleistocene footprints and the evolution of human bipedalism”
Carol Ward, University of Missouri, “Early hominin body form”
Chris Ruff, Johns Hopkins University, “Limb strength proportions and locomotion in early hominins”
Dan Lieberman, Harvard University, “The evolution and relevance of human running”
Leslie Aiello, Wenner-Gren Foundation, “Bipedalism and the evolution of the genus Homo
Matt Cartmill, Boston Univeristy, “Body fat and bipedality”


Sponsored by the G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Charitable Foundation and Annette C. Merle-Smith
The UCSD-Salk Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny ("CARTA")
Ajit Varki, UCSD, Co-Director
Fred Gage, Salk Institute, Co-Director
Margaret Schoeninger, UCSD, Co-Director
Pascal Gagneux, UCSD, Associate Director

Photography, Fieldwork, and the Anthropological Experience – Scholars Panel Discussion

Seth Mallios, Ph.D. Professor and Chair, SDSU Department of Anthropology, Historical Archaeologist

Matt Lauer, Ph.D. Associate Professor, SDSU Department of Anthropology, Cultural Anthropologist

Erin Riley, Ph.D. Associate Professor, SDSU Department of Anthropology, Biological Anthropologist

Drawing on insight from active research projects locally and around the world, Drs. Mallios, Lauer, and Riley will discuss how photography and fieldwork aid, transform, and legitimize the study of the human condition. These professors represent different sub-disciplines of anthropology—archaeology, cultural anthropology, and biological anthropology—but they each are deeply dependent on the fieldwork process and employ similar methods of collecting and documenting insight from the field, whether it be about local history, Solomon Islands indigenous fishing strategies, or Indonesian macaques. Real-time documentation of primary anthropological discovery emphasizes the authenticity of the find and indirectly upholds the importance of the endeavor, ultimately solidifying the particular anthropological narrative.

To find out more about these scholars, please visit: http://anthropology.sdsu.edu/faculty.html

Cost is museum admission, which is always free to SDMoM members.